Sunday, November 29, 2020

The Scene at the Center for the Arts

What, no legs, asks Jack McLean from New York, visiting grandparents Jim and Kathie Barzun. SUBMITTED PHOTOS

What, no legs, asks Jack McLean from New York, visiting grandparents Jim and Kathie Barzun. SUBMITTED PHOTOS

By Noelle H. Lowery
noelle@coastalbreezenews.com

With summer quickly approaching, things are heating up at the Marco Island Center for the Arts. New exhibitions, new classes and a trip to the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA) — let’s check it all out:

 

Abstraction/Distraction

May’s theme for the main galleries is “Abstraction/Distraction.” Officially opened on May 13, the exhibition includes more than 50 pieces of bold, colorful and imaginative art from artists all over the Southwest Florida area. At the center of each piece: A reflection of the many ways artists express themselves, whether in clay, mixed media, photography or paintings.

While the inspirations for the some of the pieces are immediately recognizable — a bird, a flower, a human face — others pieces invoke different thoughts and reactions from visitors, like an inkblot test. There is no one correct answer, so have fun with it.

While at the Center, remember to check out La Petite Gallerie.

Big Red, Betty Newman, mixed media.

Big Red, Betty Newman, mixed media.

It currently is featuring a one-man show by talented Naples photographer Nic Provenzo. His work focuses on “The Other Florida,” everyday scenes or special moments that many miss or tend to overlook with nary a palm tree or dolphin in sight. Both exhibits will run through May 27.

Be on the lookout for June’s exhibits. “Animal House” will be taking over the main gallery, while the La Petite Galerie will feature “Photos by Artists Over 80.” Intake of both installations is scheduled for May 29.

‘Art Gone Wild’

Living in the land of palm trees, no one here is surprised to see fallen fronds or an errant piece of bark laying in the yard or on the roads. Heidi Saletko, an instructor at the Marco Island Center for the Arts, has found a viable alternative to throwing that debris in the rubbish bin. She turns those palm fronds into totally unique art forms: Three-dimensional animal masks that can be

Pamela Shudes works on a zebra, her Big Red, Betty Newman, mixed media. favorite animal.

Pamela Shudes works on a zebra, her Big Red, Betty Newman, mixed media. favorite animal.

hung inside or out.

Now, Saletko is sharing her palm frond techniques at a monthly workshop. The first was held May 15 from 1-4 PM. Fear not, though, there are more to follow throughout the summer: June 19, July 17, August 21 and September 18. The cost of each workshop is $55 and includes acrylic paints, brushes, palm fronds etc. Just pick the animal — a lion, zebra, turtle, cockatoo, panther or any other selection — and get ready for a lot of fun.

Need some inspiration? Visit the Center’s gift shop, and see some of Saletko’s work firsthand.

Miami Museum Bound

For a change of scenery, Center officials have planned at trip across the Alley to the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA) in Miami. The all-day event is scheduled for May 31 from 7 AM-7:30 PM. The price of $115 includes a round trip luxury bus ride (which meets in the parking

Robin Spears, lft, and Mohndera Gezall paint leopards.

Robin Spears, lft, and Mohndera Gezall paint leopards.

lot of the Art Center), admissions to both museums and lunch at the Perez.

The PAMM is dedicated to 20th century and contemporary art, as well as exhibits from cultures of the Atlantic rim, or the Americas, Western Europe and Africa. The museum’s current collection numbers more than 1,800 objects — much of which has been donated — and includes such notable artists as John Baldessari, Dan Flavin, Frank Stella, Diego Rivera, Joaquin Torres-Garcia and Beatriz Gonzalez.

The MoCA’s permanent collection numbers more than 700 works and is distinguished by its major holdings of new and experimental art. Designed by internationally acclaimed architect Charles Gwathmey, the state-of-the-art facility includes a large main gallery with moveable walls, a separate art pavilion, a gift shop, art storage and preparation areas and administrative offices. An outdoor courtyard is used for performances, evening film screenings and large art installations.

For more information on everything going on at the Center, call 230-394-4221, or visit the web site at www.marcoislandart.org.

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