Friday, September 18, 2020

New Reception Desk Debuts at MIHM

Artist J.J. Stinchcomb, donors Bill and Karen Young and artist Peter  Sottong with the newly refurbished reception desk at the Marco Island Historical Museum. PHOTOS BY NOELLE H. LOWERY

Artist J.J. Stinchcomb, donors Bill and Karen Young and artist Peter Sottong with the newly refurbished reception desk at the Marco Island Historical Museum. PHOTOS BY NOELLE H. LOWERY

By Noelle H. Lowery
noelle@coastalbreezenews.com

Regular patrons of the Marco Island Historical Museum will notice something different about the lobby when they walk in during their next visit. Thanks to a generous monetary donation by Bill and Karen, the museum was able to secure a new reception desk and have it refurbished by local artist J.J. Stinchcomb.

The Youngs have been major contributors to the Marco Island Historical Society and its museum since it was built. “We felt like it was a little piece of Marco that was missing,” says Bill of the museum. As a result of the Youngs’ donation, the desk has been named in their honor.

According to Lori Wagor, enterprise manager for MIHS, the counter was given to the museum recently, and officials weren’t certain what to do with it at first. “Someone gave us this 1960s counter with brass trim and a laminate countertop,” explains Wagor. “I kept looking at it, trying to figure out what to do with it…Then, I had a eureka moment, and thought of J.J. Stinchcomb.”

Stinchcomb is known throughout Southwest Florida for his amazing oil paintings, murals and portraits. However, it was his work with faux finishes and plaster that drew Wagor to him. “The counter just called for his application. He came in, and looked at the counter. He brought samples of various applications in,” Wagor recounts.

“At first, I was just going to do a textured finished,” Stinchcomb says. “Then, someone brought in a cut palm frond, and we ended up with this fossilized, antiquated finish that incorporates plaster and a troll-over wax. It is one of my favorite finishes.” It was an arduous process. Between sanding, taping, filling joints and cracks and drying time for the plaster, the project took nine days to complete.

Adorning the desk are Peter Sottong’s paintings of various mask artifacts and photographs of replicas that can be found in the museum.

“They have done a lovely job with it,” Bill adds.

 

 

 

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