Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Mind, Body & Spirit

 

 

By Dianne Saywell

“Be faithful in small things, because it is in them that your strength lies.” – Mother Theresa

When we think about the world around us, collectively and as individuals, it seems it is inevitable that our focus is self-pointed and in accordance to our needs. They may be for such things as strength, power, money, comfort or love. The ability to change our own lives, and as a result, perhaps plant the seed for others to empower change in their lives, is found within our very own self. Not ANYWHERE else. And it begins with thought.

Our minds, being part of the body, hold the power to transform. Whether that transformation is for the benefit – or the detriment – of ourselves involves some insight, or wisdom – if you will – from our very soul.

You see, perception as we grow up and mature into adults, plays an extremely important role in how we navigate this journey called life. Bringing to mind the words “you are what you think” just may open the mind to a new way of looking at the same situation. Think about what you think about. Maybe the past or questionable future colors this vision with anxiety or deep wounds that haven’t healed. No matter what the current world looks like, the simple phrase “THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE THINKING ABOUT” can disarm and raise awareness instantly.

A thought of something pleasant can cause a smile, something fearful can hike shoulders up to your ears, or imagine a brow raising in that “AHA!” moment when you remember something important. Those images or thoughts that comes to the mind are so little, yet can impact the body so greatly. They can change the way we stand, walk, face each other or even drive. And that’s just touching the physical aspects. Not to mention when words come into play fueling further body changes. Being mindful of our thoughts as they occur or just after will make the difference in how we feel in our body, in our minds and ultimately in our souls.

Next time you notice tight shoulders, a furrowed brow or clenched fists, take a moment and think about what you’re thinking about. Take another moment to just observe the feelings. Just observe. Take a deep, full breath and continue to observe before you decide if you want to pull them back into the body. Or do you want to just keep breathing and let little bits of time pass, again and again, over and over, until you realize those thoughts are not you, and you don’t want them anymore. It takes time and awareness. That’s all. Sometimes it’s the small things that can save us from suffering and allow peace to settle over our mind, body and spirit.

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