Monday, September 28, 2020

Local Resident Staff Sgt. Joshua Hurtley Part of Air Force Team Meeting with Disney Engineer

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hurtley shows Disney’s Shawn Boling a dust shoe that was designed and printed in-house.  PHOTO BY SUSAN A. ROMANO

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hurtley shows Disney’s Shawn Boling a dust shoe that was designed and printed in-house. PHOTO BY SUSAN A. ROMANO

Submitted

Part of Air Force Team Meeting with Disney Engineer

“If you can dream it, you can do it”
Walt Disney

 

Members of the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, invited Walt Disney’s Shawn Boling to visit the center’s Innovation Lab and discuss partnering opportunities.

In August 2015, Boling, a Knowledge Management Strategist for the Walt Disney Company in Orlando, met with Innovation Lab director Capt. John W. Barron and other members of the Innovation team, including local resident Staff Sergeant Joshua Hurtley. The purpose of the meeting was to examine ways the two organizations could collaborate on projects that have been in the works since the lab was created two years ago.

The Innovation Lab’s purpose is to develop technologies at a lower cost and reduce operations maintenance and overhead while leveraging its greatest asset: its people. To date, they have been credited with more than $7 million in cost avoidance and potential savings for AFTAC, giving the center the ability to remove unfunded requirements faster and more effectively, simply by innovating from within.

Disney’s Boling had the opportunity to examine some of the projects Capt. Barron and his team has been working on. He was intrigued with the ways AFTAC uses 3-D printer technologies to equip its overseas detachments with necessary, mission-essential parts and materials.

Staff Sgt. Hurtley showed Boling a dust shoe that was designed and printed in-house on a computerized numerical control (CNC) machine. The shoe is designed to capture dust and debris from errant shavings that are produced during the milling process, and funnels the debris into a vacuum collection system. AFTAC’s Innovation Lab was able to design the shoe in a few hours, and it took 57 hours to “print.”

“I have been so impressed with the people here, and I am incredibly fascinated by the work you perform. The public has no concept of what you do here day in and day out, even though it’s right here in their backyard. I’m excited to go back at let my fellow cast members in on your amazing mission.” Boling said.

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