Wednesday, September 30, 2020

“Giants of the Everglades” Dennis Goodman Exhibit at Marco Island Historical Museum

Dennis Goodman (in front of  sunset) answers questions during the reception for his show “Giants of the Everglades”.

Dennis Goodman (in front of sunset) answers questions during the reception for his show “Giants of the Everglades”.

By Steve Gimmestad

On June 2, the opening reception for “Giants of the Everglades,” by photographer Dennis Goodman, was held at the Marco Island Historical Museum. The event, along with hors d’oeuvres and wine, was sponsored by the Marco Island Historical Society.

Dennis Goodman is an award winning photographer, and has appeared in numerous publications throughout Florida and elsewhere. He has received accolades from many organizations for his work, and for his efforts in the preserving the Everglades.

Upon entering the gallery, the “Giants” in the exhibit name not only refers to the subject matter, but also aptly describes the size of works contained therein. They envelope you. A fun hint: When you attend, close your eyes and have someone guide you to within a few feet of one of the photographs. Then open your eyes. It is difficult to describe the awe that washes through your senses.

Pam Miner, Museum Manager, was hanging the photos in preparation for the exhibit. “I was helping put up the photo of the Cypress trees. As I stood there, it felt like I was moving in the water. He really captures what the goals and objectives are for his art. We are very glad to have him here.”

“One of my goals is to show

Dennis Goodman talks about his craft and how patience plays a huge part in capturing the perfect moment.

Dennis Goodman talks about his craft and how patience plays a huge part in capturing the perfect moment.

off the beautiful nature and wildlife that we have in our area,” says Dennis. “And one way I like to do that is to print larger than life and show everything up close and personal. I try to capture the spirit of each subject in detail.”

And what detail it is. From the small whiskers on a panther’s eyelash, to the exceptional array of color found in a sunset, the details draw you in and make you part of the experience. I found it to be a very humbling experience in that we become a part of their world, rather than feeling they are part of ours.

To capture these moments, Dennis has learned that patience is more than a virtue, it is a reward. There is a photograph of an Osprey gliding in to the nest. Dennis spent over four hours waiting for the bird to return and was rewarded, not only with a great shot, but by the fact that it was delivering a fish for its hungry young.

“It may take me a year, or it may take me five years, to capture the perfect image and make it one-of-a-kind,” says Dennis of his craft. “I’m always trying to capture that one moment; that once in a

PHOTO BY DENNIS GOODMAN

PHOTO BY DENNIS GOODMAN

lifetime shot. That’s what makes it so worthwhile for me.”

To gain better control over the imaging process, Dennis had evolved his studio to offer printing in many formats. All the photos in the exhibit are printed in his studio. They are framed, or as is the case in the exhibit, printed on canvas material and wrapped around a wooden frame (most commonly known as a ‘gallery wrap’). Using his own equipment also helps get the colors and details perfect. This is a most critical aspect of the process, so every print retains the natural and vivid colors of the real subject.

Dennis is offering these printing services to the public through his studio/gallery in Naples, which is located at 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Suite 144. You can also view his works online at dennisgoodmanphotography.com. While it is great to see his works online, I highly recommend stopping by the exhibit at the museum to experience the full scope of his artwork. They will be on display through August 1.

The advent of digital photography has been a boon for the world. Scores of people can now take nice pictures, many people can produce some great photographs, yet very few can create works of art. Dennis Goodman is one of the very few.

 

 

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